What kind of learner are you?

Written on: 30 April 2019
Written by:Bethany Lowdon

Everyone learns differently, with preferred styles and techniques to take in information and develop knowledge. Being able to understand how you learn can help you make the most out of your studies.  

There are 3 main learning styles; auditory, visual and kinesthetic.  This is sound, sight or physical learning.

Determining what kind of learner you are can take time and some trial and error. But, by experimenting with different learning techniques, you will discover which you enjoy the most and how you best retain information. Understanding your own learning style allows you to play on your own individual strengths.

Auditory

Auditory learners, learn most effectively through sound and listening, taking in information by actively listening and speaking to others. This could be in the form of lectures, audio or video clips. Auditory learners benefit from group discussions, talking out loud and explaining things to others.

For auditory learners, repeating facts and linking them to sounds can help them to remember information.

Visual

Visual learners, learn most effectively by utilising graphs, charts, maps and diagrams. It can be helpful to use coloured pens and sticky notes to highlight important information.  

Individuals who are visual learners prefer to observe rather than talk and do, making visual links to information such as shapes, colours and diagrams.

Kinesthetic

Kinesthetic learners, learn most effectively from practical, hands-on activities. For these learners it can be useful to link information to specific movements. Kinesthetic learners also prefer studying with others and favour physically doing over reading and writing.

Essentially, kinesthetic learners learn by doing, such as, putting data and facts into interactive games and getting hands-on experience.

There are a number of different learning techniques and many individuals may not identify with only one specific style of learning.  Because of this, you should experiment with how you learn best and what works for you, whether this is by sound, sight or physical learning.

Written on: 30 April 2019
Written by:Bethany Lowdon